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Disk Repair FAQ

Optical disks are made of several layers: a polycarbonate layer (A), a reflective layer (B) made of a material such as aluminum, copper, silver, or gold, a lacquer layer (C) to protect the reflective layer, and a label layer (D) for disk identification.

Optical Disk Construction

Data on commercial CDs (CD-ROM) and DVDs (DVD-ROM) is stored on the polycarbonate layer of the disk as a series of bumps and pits. When an optical drive reads data from a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, light from a laser (E) is either scattered or reflected from the disk based on the patterns encoded on the polycarbonate layer. An optical drive interprets the reflection or no reflection as a stream of 1s and 0s that is sent to the CPU for processing.

Data on writable and rewritable CDs and DVDs is stored on the reflective layer. As an optical disk is burned, the laser in an optical drive marks (or "burns") the reflective layer. When an optical drive reads data from an R or RW disk, light from a laser is either scattered or reflected from the reflective layer. As with CD-ROM and DVD-ROM media, the drive interprets this as data.
The layer that typically sees the most damage is the polycarbonate layer. If there are problems with this side such as scratches or dirt on the surface, then your optical drive will not be able to see the data, resulting in errors or skips in playback. Repairing a disk involves using a special wet compound and polishing pads to buff out scratches and polish the polycarbonate layer of the disk, so that the laser can see the data clearly.
Most light to moderate damage to the polycarbonate side of a disk can be repaired. Damage created by the device (i.e. bumping a game console while a game is in use) may also be repaired in most cases.

Certain types of damage may not be repairable using our process:
  • Some very deep gouges may not be repaired – the damage in this case may be extended into the reflective layer of the disk.
  • Disks with dents or punctures will have damage to the reflective layer of a disk, which is unrepairable.
  • Cracked disks – the spinning of the disk combined with the polishing mechanism may further damage a cracked disk.
  • Warped disks may not be seated correctly in our machine and may not be repairable.
There are mixed reviews regarding remedies like the Skip Doctor, and home remedies, such as using toothpaste or furniture polish, have shown to produce inconsistent results. With products and home remedies like these, there is no guarantee of a fix, nor is there any recourse if you have any problems with its performance. For a much lower cost and far less of a headache, we can repair your disks for you, relieving you of the problems you may have with other products.
Repairing a disk may be a cost-effective solution to your replay errors. Replacing a damaged DVD may cost $10-$20, but repairing that same DVD can be as little as $1.99.
To get started, follow these steps:
  1. Visit our order form to get started. Fill in your contact information as well as some information on the disks you would like repaired.
  2. Once you have completed the order form, send us your disks. We recommend using a service that has tracking ability (USPS with delivery confirmation, FedEx, or UPS, for example).
  3. Once we receive your disks, we will send you an email confirming our receipt and we will start the repairs on your disks. If any disks are not repairable, we will let you know as well.
  4. Once the repairs are complete, we will send you another email detailing what was done and allowing you to pay via PayPal.
  5. Once payment is received, we will send your disks back to you according to your selected return shipping method.
If you are a local customer, contact us to arrange for local pickup and delivery!
Please contact us at for more assistance.

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